Posts Tagged ‘Network World’

Software defined WANs (SD-WANs) have gained market momentum so quickly because their value proposition is multi-faceted. Some enterprises have looked to SD-WAN as a way to dramatically lower network transport costs, while others are building SD-WANs to automate network operations. One of the more common use-cases I have seen is to shift toward an “active-active” architecture.

ACTIVE-ACTIVE WAN ARCHITECTURE

Historically, WANs are built on the concept of “active-passive”, where a branch can be connected using two or more links, but only the primary link is active and passing traffic.  In this scenario, the backup connection only becomes active in the event the primary connection fails. While this might seem sensible, it’s highly inefficient as enterprises are paying for far more bandwidth than they are actually leveraging. This inefficient architectural design is driving increased interest in active-active configurations.

Cisco jumps into the hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) industry and creates some interesting competitive dynamics.

Last December, I wrote a post looking at “What to expect from Cisco in 2017”. It’s a foregone conclusion that Cisco will make a number of acquisitions every year, so that’s not hard to predict. The tough part is guessing the potential targets.

One of the easier acquisitions to predict was Springpath because Cisco’s HyperFlex hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI) solution is an OEM of Springpath. The two companies have been working very closely since Springpath was founded in 2012. The product has been extremely well received by customers and channel partners, resulting in a little more than 1,800 customers to date. In fact, nearly customer and channel partner wanted the companies to join.

IT execs need to understand the benefits of this network technology in data centers and elsewhere.

[ Warning: Auto-playing video on full post page. ]

Software-defined networking (SDN) is defined by a decoupling of the control and packet-forwarding planes in a network, an architecture that can slash operational costs and speed the time it takes to make changes or provision new services.

Since all the intelligence resides in software – not baked into monolithic specialty hardware – customers can replace traditional switches with commodity devices to save on capital costs. SDN also makes it possible for the network to interface with applications directly via APIs to improve security and application performance.

Aerohive’s AP150W wall plate is packed with features, including 802.11 AC Wave 2 and Zigbee, and costs a lot less than other Wi-Fi expanding options.

In many industries, it’s critical to get Wi-Fi everywhere, but it can often be difficult accomplish this. For example, extending a hotel comprised of smaller cottage-type rooms or one with lots of suites has many hard to reach places with traditional access point (AP) placement. Dorm rooms or hospitals typically want Wi-Fi everywhere, but it’s often difficult to provision it because of interference from thick walls or other infrastructure. 

Extreme Networks announced its Q4 FY17 results, and its plan to become a bigger, stronger networking vendor that can go up against the big guys is working.

The story of Extreme Networks is one of the more remarkable turnarounds I’ve seen in technology in years. About two years ago the company had a market cap of under $300 million, and I thought they were a sure-fire acquisition target for someone who wanted some decent technology on the cheap — because it was becoming apparently clear that the once-cool networking company had lost its way like so many others before it.

The 802.11ax specification finally brings a Wi-Fi standard to the network that supports everything we want to do with our wireless LANs.

I know, I know, I’ve heard it before. A new technology comes along, and it promises to be the next big thing. Consumers and businesses buy it, and what happens? It fails to live up to the hype. In my opinion, almost every iPhone release over the past five years has been that way. Sure there were some cool new features, but overall it’s not something I’d say was game changing.

Linux has long been the basis of commercial networking devices, but is becoming more prevalent on its own in enterprise infrastructure

Linux is a tried-and-true, open source operating system released in 1991 for computers, but its use has expanded to underpin systems for cars, phones, web-servers and, more recently, networking gear.

It’s longevity, maturity and security make it one of the most trusted OSes available today, meaning it is ideal for commercial network devices as well as enterprises that want to use it and its peripherals to customize their own network and data center infrastructure.



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