ZK Research: Home
Google+
Twitter
LinkedIn
Facebook
RSS Feed

ZK Research - a proud sponsor of AI World 2017. See you there!

AI World Conference & Expo · Boston, MA · December 11-13, 2017

Posts Tagged ‘F5 Networks’

Over the last few weeks, the security industry has been rocked by the Heartbleed bug, which impacted OpenSSL-based websites. Heartbleed takes advantage of an OpenSSL feature called heartbeat, which exchanges data between the user’s computer and the webserver. Heartbleed causes the web server to send back a massive amount of data, rather than only the data it’s supposed to, including sensitive, private customer information. The bug caused many companies and vendors to scramble to develop a fix to prevent any further leakage of data.

However, F5 customers were protected from the bug if they were running the security module. F5’s cipher stack customers were not affected as the bogus requests were identified and dealt with before they could get to the web server. It actually makes a strong case for running SSL offload in the application delivery controller (ADC) as a matter of standard practice.

So, that’s great for customers who use SSL offload, but what about customers who do not? Well, for that F5 actually created an iRule within a couple of hours of heartbleed being discovered. Customers could then apply the iRule to the F5 ADC and be protected from it.

[keep reading…]

Queue up F5’s CEO of John McAdam as he prepares to address Wall Street for the company’s quarterly call to discuss the state of the business. Out he comes and is asked to walk everyone through the past quarter. He goes off on a rant and shouts, “We’re the best ADC in the game! When you try us with a sorry ADC like Netscaler, that’s the result you’re going to get. Don’t you ever talk about F5 or I’ll shut you up!”

That, of course, didn’t happen, but the tech industry would be a whole lot more interesting if tech CEOs acted more like the Seahawks’ Richard Sherman and beat their chests a little more. This was a quarter where F5 could have gotten away with it.

Over the past year, the former darling of the tech industry had fallen on hard times. The business had slowed down and the stock had dipped below $70/share, a number it hadn’t been at since 2010. This prompted many to wonder if F5’s best days were behind them, partially due to the fact that Citrix had stepped up the competitive pressure through its Cisco partnership.

[keep reading…]

One of the primary value propositions of Software Defined Networks (SDNs) is that it optimizes the performance of the applications that run on networks today. However, almost all of the SDN-related products that have been released to date operate at layer 2/3 which, of course, have no direct relevance to applications. I agree that if there’s congestion or something else impacting performance at those lower layers, applications themselves will be impacted, but for the most part, the world of applications and networks have been managed in independent silos.

To help bridge this gap between applications and networks, many network managers, data center folks and even some application developers have turned to application delivery controllers (ADCs). The ADC speaks both the language of networks and applications and can be thought of as the “Rosetta stone” of IT, and plays a key role in enterprises’ ability to roll out applications rapidly and keep them performing optimally.

However, SDNs have recently turned the networking world upside down. Things that were physical are now software-based and virtual. Networking has a level of dynamism that has never been seen before. This trend has raised the question of what the role of the ADC is in this new virtual, software-driven world.

[keep reading…]

Earlier this month, F5 announced its ScaleN architecture designed to make it easier for companies to deploy a software defined network and extend virtual networks to the cloud. ScaleN can be thought of as a unified set of virtual and physical infrastructure that has been configured to optimize SDN environments. ScaleN also provides a new feature called iCall, which is an extension of its popular iRules scripting language and gives F5 ADCs the capability of dynamically reconfiguring based on the real-time status of the ADC infrastructure. The iCall technology allows for applications or networks to interface with the ADCs to trigger the reconfiguration.

Looking at this functionality, it’s easy to see that there’s significant overlap with traditional SDN controllers. One of the value propositions of SDNs is that the controllers offer a set of northbound application programming interfaces (APIs) that give applications more control of the network. F5’s iRules has given customers the ability to create custom features to handle network and application events. But iCall brings automation to F5 infrastructure, removing the need for manual intervention. It would seem that much of the value of the SDN controller is being wrapped into the ADC, and why not? The application delivery infrastructure already sits between the network and application tiers, similarly to how many of the SDN controller vendors position their products.

[keep reading…]

I’m not sure there’s a city that’s more synonymous with fun than New Orleans. The home of Mardi Gras, several Super Bowls, Bourbon Street and Jazz Festivals is always a great place to visit if you’re looking to have some great entertainment. Well, there’s an event that tops all of them for fun, and that’s Microsoft’s North American Tech Ed event.

Tech Ed is the event to go to if you’re a Microsoft professional or developer. It’s the most fun and happening place if you’re looking to learn about the latest and greatest in the world of Microsoft. Two of the hotter areas of interest for the Microsoft professional today are the cloud and virtualization. At this year’s Tech Ed, Application Deliver Controller vendor F5 is demonstrating new features that can bridge the gap between the physical, virtual and cloud environments.

[keep reading…]

Communities of interest have been all the rage over the past few years. Just this year alone we’ve seen Infoblox, Aruba and other tech vendors launch online communities to support their products. The concept behind the community is that users of the products can share ideas, use cases, scripts, architectures or anything else related to the product, and what better way to learn about what’s possible than by leveraging the power of the community.

Although there are many vendors trying to build this today, no one has executed on this better than F5 Networks. For those who aren’t familiar with F5, the company has a scripting language called iRules that administrators can use to enable custom features and do some cool things with the products. DevCentral was created to allow the community to share these ideas, scripts and use cases with one another, and over the past few years it’s become extremely popular and easily F5’s biggest competitive differentiator.

This week F5 made its biggest enhancement to DevCentral since its announcement that it’s moving DevCentral to the cloud. All cloud-enabled F5 solutions will now be running in multiple Bluelock virtual data centers, making the functionality ubiquitously available to the DevCentral community.

[keep reading…]

ZK Research is proudly powered by WordPress | Entries (RSS) | Comments (RSS) | Custom Theme by The Website Taylor