Posts Tagged ‘Cisco’

Merriam-Webster defines the word “borderless” to be simply “being without a border”.  By definition, Cisco’s Borderless Network Architecture means a network with no borders.  It’s a simple statement but from the conversations I’ve had with decision makers, it’s not the simplest concept to grasp.  Some I’ve talked to think of “borderless” to mean a network with no firewalls or a big, flat network.   A network without borders can have a number of different meanings (according to Merriam) but in Cisco’s case it’s actually referring to the boundaries that prevent us from doing what it is we are trying to accomplish. 

The easiest way that I know to describe what Borderless Networks can do is to get companies to think about the vision of any worker being able to accomplish any task, on any device from wherever they are.  Now think about the borders that currently prevent the company from accomplishing this goal.  Cisco’s Borderless Networks is an architecture that will allow companies to remove those borders and fulfill on this any, any, any vision.

The appeal has nothing to do with VoIP, but has to do with video interoperability.

Earlier today Cisco posted a blog that indicated the company is appealing the European Commission’s approval of the Microsoft/Skype merger to the General Court of the European Union. The blog also indicated that Messagenet, an Italian Service Provider, has joined Cisco in the appeal.

Contrary to what one might think, the appeal has nothing to do with VoIP, but has to do with video interoperability. As Cisco stated in their blog, their goal is to “make video calling as easy and seamless as an email is today. Making a video-to-video call should be as easy as dialing a phone number.”

Frankly, this should be the goal for the entire video industry yet, despite advancements in this area in the last couple of years, we’re still light years away from achieving this. Solving this problem would be greatly beneficial to the entire video industry and would create a “rising tide” that would lift all the boats. Metcalf’s Law states the value of a network is proportional to the square of the number of connected end points. More connected end points means more value. The video industry has many end points but they’re all in independent islands, so the value remains limited.

Despite the on going feud between Cisco and HP, the two IT giants put aside their difference and jointly collaborated to co-engineer a Cisco Fabric Extender (FEX) blade that will be the network inside an HP BladeSystem chassis.

There are certain expressions we use in life to describe situations that are so improbable that the issue we are talking about will likely never happen. Expressions such as “when Hell freezes over” and “when pigs fly” are a couple of them. In tech, we could have used the expression “When HP and Cisco work together” as our own version of this as the two companies have become bitter, mortal enemies. The Procurve group at HP spends most of its airtime describing why Cisco is too expensive. In fact, I was at an HP customer event a few months back (not as an analyst, I went with a few IT people I knew) and the HP presenters spent 90% of the time just bashing Cisco instead of talking about their own products.

Huawei has been a disruptor in the telecom market for years but remained only a perceived threat to enterprise infrastructure suppliers. Huawei’s broad portfolio coupled with it’s quality engineering gives Huawei a better than punchers chance of becoming a dominant enterprise vendor. Most enterprise buyers will likely stay with their incumbent vendors in the short term but Huawei’s massive size and scale make them a long term threat to the status quo.

Taking center stage at Interop last week was industry veteran John Roese. Those of us that have been around the industry for a while recognize John as one of true industry thought leaders and associate his name with companies such as Nortel and Enterasys but had gone radio silent over the past couple of years. Well Mr. Roese reappeared at Interop New York but this time sporting a name badge that listed him as VP and GM of Huawei’s North American Enterprise business and they’ve aimed their crosshairs at the mighty Cisco.

I’ve come to the conclusion that the adoption of 100 Gig to be much bigger than 40 Gig. To me, 40 Gig was really a step on the way to 100 Gig. Ethernet has historically jumped in logarithmic steps and a 4x jump just doesn’t seem like the bang is there for the buck spent on new hardware and upgrades.

The standard for 100 Gig-E was ratified last year and since then we’ve had a number of vendors, the usual suspects – Juniper, Cisco, ALU and Brocade, launch 100 Gig-E line cards. Recently, I had a chance to discuss the topic with Greg Hankins, Global Solutions Architect for Service Providers at Brocade.  I thought I would share some of my thoughts on the 100 Gig-E market.

Today, Cisco announced AppHQ, a corporate-focused Android app store for its Cius tablet.

What makes AppHQ different from the consumer app-based open source Android Marketplace is that AppHQ’s applications will focus primarily on the enterprise market and unique corporate mobile use cases (and not just tablet versions of corporate applications). For example, many AppHQ apps will be vertically oriented, i.e., focused on medical, field service, campus workers and corporate executives – and that will be a great differentiator for Cisco and allow the company to stretch its lead over Microsoft and other competitiors.

See the Yankee Group report “Cisco Expands its Communications and Collaboration Portfolio with Cius and AppHQ” for further analysis.

Amid much speculation that Polycom was on the selling block, with HP being the primary possible acquirer, Polycom made the following announcements this morning:

  • Polycom acquired the Visual Collaboration Unit from HP, which includes all of the Halo products and managed services
  • Polycom and HP inked an agreement where HP would use Polycom as it’s exclusive partner for Telepresence and video UC solutions
  • Polycom announced the creation of the “Open Visual Communications Consortium” with a number of service providers including AT&T, BT conferencing, Global Crossing, Orange Business Services, Telefonica, Verizon and other service providers to drive B2B and B2C adoption of video
  • Polycom and Microsoft announced an expanded partnership that includes two products but at the time of press release did not announce any details on these products

These announcements are an interesting twist in growing saga that is corporate video conferencing.  About a year ago, Cisco closed on the acquisition of Tandberg creating a tremendous amount of speculation that Polycom would be acquired as well.  The logic being that, in an environment where video is becoming a core component of UC, it would be difficult for a video pure play to exist.  Names like Silver Lake (Avaya), Gore Group (Siemens) and Dell were tossed around as possible acquirers, but HP appeared to be the front-runner.  HP made some sense for a couple of reasons:  (1) It had its own niche video unit (Halo) and Polycom would bolster it; and (2) HP could use Polycom to close the product gap with Cisco, who HP appears obsessed with from a competitive standpoint.



Insight and Influence Through Social Media
ZK Research: Home
Google+
Twitter
LinkedIn
Facebook
RSS Feed
ZK Research is proudly powered by WordPress | Entries (RSS) | Comments (RSS) | Custom Theme by The Website Taylor