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AI World Conference & Expo · Boston, MA · December 11-13, 2017

Connecting to a local cloud provides the best performance. If you can’t do that, content delivery networks (CDNs) or edge data centers can help.

In real estate, there’s a mantra that most agents use of “location, location, location,” meaning houses that may be equal in many ways will cost more the closer you get to something of value. For example, the San Jose Mercury News recently published a story about a house in Sunnyvale, California, that sold for $782,000 over asking price. Why such a ridiculous amount? Because it’s near Apple’s new campus — location matters.

Aruba 360 Security Fabric leverages Aruba’s networking and security products to provide network-wide security to an increasingly digital world.

Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company, is best known for its outstanding business-grade Wi-Fi products. What’s less well known about Aruba is that it has always had excellent security products. In fact, I’ve often described the company as a security vendor dressed up as a Wi-Fi vendor, as Aruba and security have gone hand in hand like the New England Patriots and winning.

However, Aruba’s security positioning has always been tactical rather than strategic because its products were used for specific purposes, such as end point protection or wireless security. That shifted this week at APAC Atmosphere in Macau when the company introduced its 360 Security Fabric, which enables it to provide end-to-end security to address the needs of a world that is becoming increasingly digitized.

Takes steps away from infrastructure toward becoming a stronger, more innovative endpoint company.

When Polycom went private in July 2016, it was clear that the company needed to do something different to jump start it back into growth mode. Its infrastructure business was the anchor for the company, which was sinking faster than the NY Jets chances of making the playoffs.

Making a significant strategy change as a publicly traded company is very difficult. Now that it’s private, it’s able to move in a new direction more easily. The new strategy laid out upon going private was to de-emphasize the infrastructure business and become a stronger, more innovative endpoint company. This has caused some confusion and there are many rumors that Polycom is getting out of infrastructure altogether — that’s not the case, but there’s certainly more focus on endpoints as of late.

As network complexity rises, network management gets harder. Automation, such as the Extreme – Avaya Networking solution, eliminates tasks and allows for more innovation.

It’s been about two months since Extreme Networks closed on the acquisition of Avaya Networking. As I pointed out, Extreme’s first partial quarter post close was a smashing success, which indicates the company is headed in the right direction. But now the real work begins.

In the two months since the close, the company has been extremely busy (pun intended) doing a bunch of things to integrate the companies, such as onboarding workers, bringing systems together and holding a unified sales conference. These things are obviously interesting and important, but the question on most customers’ minds is how long before there is integration at a product level?

ZeroStack CEO David Greene discusses the accelerated growth of private clouds, why companies are turning to them, and the role ZeroStack plays in their deployment.

In June, private cloud infrastructure provider ZeroStack hired David Greene as its new CEO. For those of you who have followed the networking space closely, you may recognize Greene as the chief marketing officer of a couple of companies that were pioneers in their respective industries. Most recently, he was at Aerohive, one of the first Wi-Fi vendors to embrace a completely controller-less model.

It’s all about providing choice to consumers.

About three and a half years ago, Facebook dropped a cool $19 billion to buy the consumer messaging app WhatsApp. Since then the user base has more than doubled, from about 450 million to a shade over a billion. But to date Facebook has yet to make any money from its hefty investment.

In some ways, WhatsApp has actually hurt Facebook’s revenue stream. Recall the company also has Facebook Messenger, which together with WhatsApp gives it two of the most widely used messaging apps. Which of the two users favor tends to depend on geography, as you can see on this map. For example, Messenger sees wide use in the U.S., Canada, and Australia, whereas WhatsApp is the most popular app in Russia, South America, most of Africa, and India, with more than 200 million active users there. A quick scan of Facebook’s most recent quarterly numbers shows that Messenger-dominated countries generate about $20 per user, but the company only gets about $2.15 per user in Asia and India where WhatsApp rules.

Dell EMC and VMware announced two joint solutions, VxRail 4.5 and VxRack, enabling users to take advantage of HCI and quickly integrate it with existing VMware software.

In the world of technology, August is normally a fairly quiet month, and overall it was—but not in the realm of hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI).

Around mid-August, Cisco finally announced the long overdue acquisition of Springpath, indicating it sees a strong potential upside in this market. Also in August, VMware held its annual user event, VMworld, and at the event it and its closest technology partner, Dell EMC, made a significant amount of news in the area of HCI.



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