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Archive for the ‘From: No Jitter’ Category

By Lync-qualifying all of its indoor and outdoor 802.11ac products, from the entry level up to industrial-grade series, Aruba is supporting Lync in almost any environment.

If you’ve ever been to the country of Aruba, one of the unique characteristics is that it rarely rains there. In fact, I’ve been there a few times and never experienced a drop of rain. I guess that’s why there are so many happy Arubans! However, the other Aruba, Aruba Networks, is hoping to make a lot of rain by making Microsoft Lync customers happy.

Last week, the Wi-Fi vendor announced that its 802.11ac access points (APs) are the first to be certified under the Microsoft Lync Server Wi-Fi qualification program. The qualification includes both indoor APs, where most of the industry has focused, as well as Aruba’s outdoor APs, which I believe to be a growing area as more and more organizations are looking to extend wireless outside the walls of the building. Also, the qualification ensures that the configuration of the wireless networks adheres to the rigid guidelines laid out by Microsoft to ensure quality voice and video transmission.

ShoreTel announced a major update to its ShoreTel Mobility client that brings video into the fold, and I think the solution hits the nail on the proverbial video head.

ShoreTel has been one of the leading unified communications (UC) solution providers for many years. However, despite their strong product suite, the company had a big hole in its portfolio – it didn’t have a video solution. Last week ShoreTel announced a major update to its ShoreTel Mobility client that brings video into the fold, and I think the solution hits the nail on the proverbial video head.

Historically, video may have been UC’s ugly stepchild, but it has been gaining momentum over the past few years and now is considered a core part of a UC solution. There are still some video skeptics out there, but these tend to be older, stodgy people that don’t fully appreciated the value that video brings.

Video usage has shifted over the past five years. Historically, enterprise video was done primarily in board rooms or conference rooms and used mainly for scheduled calls. Today though, video is being used more and more on mobile devices and laptops.

A recent analysis of Avaya looked at every element of its business, including go-to-market, financials, product innovation and roadmap, and compared it to the current market transitions.

I recently did a project with Avaya where I interviewed all their top executives and analyzed where the company stands today in relation to the markets that Avaya plays in. The result was a comprehensive report (available at the ZK Research home page).

The report goes into depth and includes some case studies and product detail, and I thought it was worth summarizing here. The analysis looked at every element of Avaya’s business, including go-to-market, financials, product innovation and roadmap, and compared it to the current market transitions.

First, for a bit of background, part of my research methodology is to look for markets in transition. I’m a firm believer that significant market share shifts only happen when markets themselves shift. If there’s no shift, there’s no reason for customers to choose a new vendor. Once in a while the industry might see something like when HP jumped into switching and grabbed some share, but they did it by offering products at a dramatically lower cost. These situations, though, are rare.

We haven’t had a new entrant into the VoIP infrastructure space in quite some time. Ubiquiti Networks snuck up on the industry in the Wi-Fi space, and I certainly expect them to make some noise in the VoIP market.

The end of July brings with it Major League Baseball’s trading deadline. Teams need to decide whether they are in contention or not. If they are, they then need to decide whether to go for it, and this creates some excitement as fans like myself get to curse their favorite teams as they do stupid things like trade Jon Lester. Whether your team is on the buying or selling side, it’s an exciting time of the year.

However, the tech industry is far less interesting this time of year, as many vendors hold off on product launches for the fall. This year though, we’ve had some interesting news with Apple announcing a partnership with IBM and Microsoft lopping off 18,000 workers. Additionally, on July 30, Ubiquiti Networks announced that it was formally entering the Enterprise VoIP market.

Earlier this week, Cisco announced DevNet – the company’s latest program aimed at wooing developers.

Focusing on developers is nothing new to Cisco, as the company has had different programs targeting developer partners for over a decade. Cisco’s first attempt at building an ISV community came when Cisco acquired Metreos to develop applications for Cisco IP phones. After that, the VoIP program morphed into the Cisco Technology Developer Program (CTDP) and was focused more broadly on UC.

Since then, Cisco has added more developer programs, including the Application eXchange Program (AXP), Mobile Service Engine (MSE), WebEx developer environment, a call center developer forum and others. Most recently the company has added developer tools for the Application Policy Infrastructure Controller (APIC) for SDNs and for Internet of Things (IoT). The net result is that Cisco has many individual developer programs for the various business units.

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