ZK Research - a proud sponsor of AI World 2017. See you there!

AI World Conference & Expo · Boston, MA · December 11-13, 2017

Archive for October 2013

The launch is done, the product is released, new colors and new attitude. Now we need to see product, vision, and customer wins.

On Sunday, Shelia McGee-Smith posted her last blog on Siemens Enterprise Communications. Today, of course, the company held its big media event in New York and unveiled thenew name–Unify. The name Siemens will live on and sell all the “other” stuff, like medical equipment, light rail, HVAC systems and other stuff we in the nojitter.com audience really don’t care about–but Siemens as a communications brand has run its course.

Frankly, it’s about time. Sheila went into a bit of history, so I will as well. I actually deployed some old Rolm stuff when I was consultant years ago. As an analyst, though, I started covering Siemens way back when George Nolan was running the North American business and Bernd Kuhlin was running the business unit then known as Siemens ICN. This was a period of hit and miss for Siemens–they had some hits but more misses.

Oracle World 2013 finished up a couple of weeks ago, and I’ve had a bit of time to reflect on the event. On the Wednesday of the event I spoke at a luncheon hosted by the former Acme Packet Group, which was acquired by Oracle earlier this year. I hadn’t been to Oracle World in a number of years and I wasn’t sure what to expect given the fact that historically Oracle and communications went together about as well as Larry Ellison and Bill Gates.

However, things are changing and everyone is jockeying to move into other markets. That’s why Cisco sells servers and HP sells networking gear. Since Ellison chose to go watch his ship race rather than show up to his own keynote, I have no idea whether he was going to mention communications or not, but make no mistake, Oracle has moved into communications and is here to stay.

Much of the focus of the Acme Packet lunch was on SIP trunking, which was highlighted by a large customer of theirs that had recently migrated the company to all SIP trunks and talked about some of the best practices regarding the migration.

Akamai is holding its Edge user conference this week in our nation’s capital. There may not be much going on in Washington these days, other than arguing over whether the Washington Redskins should change their name or not, but there appears to be a lot going on between Akamai and Cisco.

At the event, Akamai announced that it would be integrating its Unified Performance technology into Cisco’s ISR-AX branch routers to optimize WAN performance and hybrid cloud performance. The partnership extends Cisco’s Intelligent WAN or IWAN, solutions designed to deliver a wide area network that is cost-effective but still optimizes the performance of web- and business-critical applications.

Cisco’s IWAN offerings currently consist of WAN optimization, Application Visibility and Control (AVC), security and other optimization techniques. This partnership extends the Akamai caching and content delivery capabilities to the branch by effectively making every Cisco ISR-AX a mini Akamai point of presence.

Akamai is holding its Edge user conference this week in our nation’s capital. There may not be much going on in Washington these days, other than arguing over whether the Washington Redskins should change their name or not, but there appears to be a lot going on between Akamai and Cisco.

At the event, Akamai announced that it would be integrating its Unified Performance technology into Cisco’s ISR-AX branch routers to optimize WAN performance and hybrid cloud performance. The partnership extends Cisco’s Intelligent WAN or IWAN, solutions designed to deliver a wide area network that is cost-effective but still optimizes the performance of web- and business-critical applications.

Cisco’s IWAN offerings currently consist of WAN optimization, Application Visibility and Control (AVC), security and other optimization techniques. This partnership extends the Akamai caching and content delivery capabilities to the branch by effectively making every Cisco ISR-AX a mini Akamai point of presence.

Oct
9
2013

The company announces a virtualized SBC that share the code base and full functionality of its appliances.

To say that software defined networks has been hot is as gross an understatement as saying Boston sports team are better than Chicago sports teams. The statement is so obvious, you’re almost embarrassed to say it. However, while nothing’s changed on the sports front (Theo, enjoying the Red Sox run?), I do believe things are changing in the world of SDNs. Initially, the market focused on the economics of networking and programmability, but it seems recently the market has shifted the focus of SDNs to network function virtualization (NFV).

For those not familiar with the concept of NFV, this technology allows for specific network services to be virtualized and then run on a hypervisor. The concept actually isn’t new. When I became an analyst way back in 2001, my first report was on a category of products called “IP Service Switches” that enabled things like network-based firewalls, routers, etc.

This market crashed and burned rapidly. Why? Well one of the big issues is that these products were very expensive–some starting at a few hundred thousand. Virtualization technology was something that geeks played with and was in no way mainstream. Today, the entire economic model of the server industry has been turned upside down, as virtualization technology is now robust enough to handle even the most demanding workloads, enabling cost-effective NFV.

It’s been an interesting past few months for Cisco’s CEO John Chambers. The company’s stock has had a nice run over the past year, rising from $17 to $27, but recently has fallen to a little over $23. The company has continued to drive well above industry average margins, making Cisco one of the most profitable tech companies out there. But Cisco recently announced it was laying off about 4000 workers. One could say that he’s a lot like Katy Perry in the way they dance (remember “Cisco Inferno” to kick off Cisco Live a few years ago?) and that “he’s hot and he’s cold, he’s up and he’s down.”

Cisco has been criticized for being late to articulate its vision of the evolution of the data center, but yesterday, the first full day of Interop, Chambers had another up moment. After a six-year hiatus, the CEO of the world’s largest networking company finally made a return to the main stage at Interop.

The company’s controller-less architecture allows for a more gradual replacement of 802.11n with 802.11ac in the enterprise.

It’s Interop time in New York this week, and given the state of the Yankees, Mets, Giants and Jets; it’s the most exciting thing going on in NY right now. Looking at that pathetic list of teams, the Jets might be the best of the group! Certainly a far cry from the Boston sports teams…. Enough gloating though, and now to Interop.

I’m expecting to see a number of announcements this week related to WiFi, given the momentum in that market due to BYOD and the fact that 802.11ac is finally here. For those who haven’t followed this specific market, 802.11ac brings Gigabit WiFi to companies, allowing the wireless network to support high-performance applications such as video and VDI (virtual desktop infrastructure).

Aerohive this morning announced two new access points (APs), the AP 370 and AP390 that support the 802.11ac standard. The transition to 802.11ac provides an interesting use case for the company’s controller-less architecture. As the name would indicate, the controller-less deployment model means IT can deploy WiFi throughout its enterprise without the need for controllers or an overlay network. This can be particularly useful with transitioning to 802.11ac, as the IT department can “salt and pepper” the ac access points with the existing 11n ones and provide the gigabit speeds where required.



Insight and Influence Through Social Media
ZK Research: Home
Google+
Twitter
LinkedIn
Facebook
RSS Feed
ZK Research is proudly powered by WordPress | Entries (RSS) | Comments (RSS) | Custom Theme by The Website Taylor