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Archive for 2012

It’s hard to believe, but we’re almost at the end of 2012, which means it’s time to look ahead towards 2013. I wrote a predictions blog earlier that looked at a few trends, but I think there are a handful of companies worth watching next year. As you can imagine, some of them are smaller startups, but some are more established companies.

Magor

Located in Kanata, Ottawa, Magor doesn’t get nearly the same level of media coverage as the louder, more brash Vidyo, but the Magor solution is every bit as game changing, in many ways more so. Magor leverages the flexibility of SVC, desktop sharing and UC to create a unique collaborative environment. Anyone I’ve talked to who has used the solution based on “visual conversations” loves it. Magor’s challenge for 2013 is to raise the level of awareness so people don’t say “who?” when I ask them if they’ve tried the solution.

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2013 is going to be a big year of change for Cisco as it tries to make the shift from networking vendor to IT solution provider.

It’s December, which means “tis the season” for many things like being jolly, spending too much time in malls because I waited too long to go shopping, and making predictions. Normally I make broader, industry-wide predictions, but I thought this year I would focus them on Cisco.

Why Cisco? Well, I think 2013 is going to be a big year of change for Cisco as it tries to make the shift from networking vendor to IT solution provider and I think it’s worth a deeper look:

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Most of the focus of software-defined networks (SDNs) has been on how it impacts the layer 2/3 switch vendors. The industry seems to have moved off of this notion that it commoditizes the underlying infrastructure, but recently another question has come up. Big Switch recently launched the company and related products, one of which is called “Big Tap,” that provide traffic visibility functionality similar to what one might get from vendors such as Gigamon and VSS. This has raised a question: are SDNs a death knell to the traffic visibility vendors?

I looked at this and then talked to a number of customers, including Big Switch, and I believe the information that one can get out of an SDN-led product to be very much complementary to the traffic visibility market, not competitive. Think of “Big Tap” as being traffic visibility light where they provide a very basic level of information. The level of information that one gets from the dedicated vendors is much richer and more granular than what one would get from Big Tap.

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SDC would abstract areas of complexity up into the software layer, ultimately making the environment more manageable.

Despite the hype over the past few years around the term “software defined networks” (SDNs), customers are just starting to understand its benefits. I’ve talked to people that recently attended the Gartner Data Center conference, and the feedback is consistent with what I’ve witnessed–the majority of organizations are still in the learning phase when it comes to SDN. However, what seems to be well understood now is that networks are complicated and could use better automation through centralized data abstraction. The same thing can be said for unified communications.

What the industry needs is some concept of “software defined collaboration” or SDC, to abstract the areas of complexity up into the software layer, ultimately making the environment more manageable.

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Well, it’s hard to believe but the year is almost up and there are only a mere couple of weeks until we ring in the New Year. So that makes it prediction time for us industry analysts and I’d like to share mine with you. So, drum roll please…

  • 2013 will not be the year of Software Defined Networks. The media hype around SDNs is at an all-time high. However, contrary to some of the predictions I’ve seen, 2013 will not be the year of the SDN as most enterprise network managers are trying to figure out what exactly SDNs are and how they can leverage them. The notion that a technology with such a big architectural difference from the status quo could have rapid uptake is as ridiculous as thinking that Mark Sanchez might actually make a good QB one day. I predict that 2013 will be the year of SDN research, and we’ll start to see some best practices developed and some case studies created.
  • The Application Delivery Controller (ADC) will become part of SDN architecture. I’ve never really liked the term “software” defined networks because software shouldn’t define anything. Software can reconfigure the network, but applications should define it. If that’s the case, what network device has the most knowledge of applications? The ADC does and that’s why the ADC either needs to pass along application information to the controller or actually take on controller functionality. Either way, we’ll see market leader F5 and its band of competitors become relevant to SDNs.
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A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post defining what “open networking” really meant and how it should be defined. On Monday morning, one of the companies I mentioned in the blog, Pica8, announced its vision and reference architecture for software defined networks (SDNs). While I believe that we’re very early in the cycle for SDNs and most enterprises will look for fully integrated, complete solutions, large, network-centric enterprises, cloud providers and service providers will lean towards open, agile platforms to create competitive differentiation.

Pica8’s solution is designed to be a network development platform for cloud providers and includes a physical switch with an integrated hypervisor virtual switch and an SDN controller using OpenFlow 1.2 as the communications protocol between all of the components of the solution. The Pica8 PicOS operating system utilizes both the Open vSwitch 1.7.1 with OpenStack and the above mentioned OpenFlow 1.2 protocol and integrates with the Ryu controller designed by NTT, specifically for cloud providers.

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